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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,350 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> rose: welcome to the program. to want, a conversation with mohamed morsi, the president of egypt. >> ( translated ): what happened in cairo was not something that was directed, aimed at the u.s. embassy as an attack, however, the u.s. embassy represents a symbol for the egyptians to express their-- they did not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not
as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this is depending on the definition of an ally. we have a real partnership in the interest and we want to achieve the interest of the world and to participate in many issues-- diplomatic, political, economical-- exchange of expertise in several areas. so the understanding of an ally as a part of a military alliance this is not existing right now. but if you mean by ally, partner and special diplomatic relationship and cooperation we are that ally. >> rose: president morsi for the hour. next. >> tonight a spe
of egypt, the mightiest empire of the ancient world. he was a god. nothing was beyond his means. when tutankhamun sat upon his throne, thousands of years of history and achievement had already preceded him. surely a nation that could bring itself into being and create wonders like the great pyramids could overcome man's final enemy--death. and overcome death tutankhamun has--at least according to the ancient egyptian funerary beliefs, for the very act of speaking his name provides magic to infuse tutankhamun with everlasting life. names were important to the egyptians. a name symbolized one's personality and even one's very existence. to remember the dead was to make them live again. and so tutankhamun must, for the whole world has known his name ever since that day in november of 1922, when archeologist howard carter anhis patron, lord carnarvon, turned a forgotten pharaoh into a legend. the story of tutankhamun's treasures begins here in the secret valley of the kings in egypt, across the river from the ancient capital of thebes. the valley of the kings is hot and very dry. in the s
and the middle east. two of our outpost attacked on the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks 11 years ago. in egypt, the american embassy staff were assessing reports of a possible demonstration outside the embassy in cairo. the embassy sent out a message, that was sympathetic to muslims, upset by the movie, tweeting that we condemn the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of muslims. just before 5:00 p.m. eastern, they rioted, breaching walls and tearing down an american flag and replacing it with a black flag that is in favor of radicals in the region. including elements of al qaeda. the embassy again tweeted, this morning's condemnation, issued before this began, still stands, as does our combination of the unjustified breach of the embassy. a little over an hour later, reports began to surface that the u.s. consulate in benghazi was in flames after being stormed by armed gunmen. moments later, a libyan official said that an employee had been killed and another wounded. as we reported to you here you last night. on last night's broadcast, democrats and repub
. there were questions about that security in libya and egypt before the attacks. what does $1.5 billion buy you knows days? apparently not an ally. that's what president obama said last night about egypt, which gets boatload of money from the american taxpayers. late today, the administration tried to walk that back. this comes as the american diplomatic outposts all over the world are on heightened alert and the u.s. citizens are warned about dangers of traveling in some spaces. here is chief white house correspondent ed henry. >> one day after accusing the republican rival of shooting first and aiming later, president obama's own administration was in damage control mode after the president used interview with telemundo to reveal what sounded like dramatic shift in u.s. policy toward egypt. >> i don't think we would consider them an ally but we don't consider them an enemy. they are a new government trying to find its way. >> in the 1980s, egypt was designated a handful of major non-nato allies under u.s. law enjoys special status, buying american military equipment more easily. nonethele
night. >> greta: you are looking live at cairo, egypt. it is almost dawn. 4:00 a.m. violence is feared and thought to be imminent. the muslim brotherhood and other radical islamic groups, calling for massive anti-american protests. not only in egypts, but countries across the region. today, chaos in another u.s. embassy, this time, yemen, angry protesters chanting death to america, death to israel and burning american flags. now, all of this amid growing criticism of the obama administration's handling of this international crisis, a crisis that has now led to the murder of four americans, whiching the u.s. ambassador, libya and two former navy seals. >> the world needs american leadership, the middle-east needs american leader help and i intend to be a president that provides the leadership that america respects. >> would you consider the current egyptian regime an ally of the united states? >> i don't think we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. >> we don't have the mutual defense treat weegypt. what we do have is a very strong defense relationship. we e
in flames. you look at what's happening in tunisia, morocco, egypt, libya. >> i thought today mitt romney thought because of this escalating violence and the potential, approaching friday morning prayers in the muslim world. it is not a good time necessarily to hammer away as he did the day before. >> he had a very specific criticism, which was he was strongly critical of the statement that was put out by the administration, via the administration. >> after the administration withdrew that statement, why did he have to double down the next morning after we knew the american ambassador and three other americans were killed? >> at the time the initial statement went out, we knew there had been violence. the embassy in cairo had reissued the statement via social networks. it was still a point of disagreement. >> the white house had distanced themselves by the next day from the cairo embassy statement. he was disavowing the statement too. he was getting a lot of criticism. i think it was fair to point out there were major differences between the administration and governor romney on our overa
or if american personnel have already been evacuated. >>> this while violent clashes continued overnight in egypt. we are looking at the streets of cairo. right no protestors are still filling those streets. there was a second protest there in cairo. you are looking also at brand new video from outside of the u.s. embassy in cairo. police have been using tear gas to disperse thousands of protestors who are in the street. >> american troe dozier's anti p muslim movie made here in the u.s. they are also looking at the possibility this is linked to the deadly attack on the consulate in benghazi. four americans killed including the u.s. ambassador in libya. (chanting) >> meantime riots breaking out in tunisia where dozens of pro tests burning the american flag you suicide of the u.s. embassy. >> let's get the latest from our own gregg palkot who joins us live from london. a lot going on. what's the update? >> we were just speaking with a yemeni official. he tells me in fact the perimeter walls the security core done around the u.s. embassy in the capital of yemen have been breached by protestors. he
and set fires. in cairo, egypt, force used tear gas there. it is over a film that was produced in the united states and said to be insulting to islam. >>> u.s. drones join the manhunt for those who killed a u.s. diplomat and three other americans. concerns over the tep id response by the new regime in egypt. >> i don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. >> we're covering every angle of this developing story. first, let's take a step back and look at how things have unfolded over the past 48 hours. the outrage first ignited tuesday in egypt. protesters converged on the embassy. within hours, crowds gathered outside benghazi, libya. armed militants killed the u.s. ambassador and three of the staffers. today, crowds storm the u.s. embassy in yemen. riot police eventually turned them back with tear gas. also today, demonstrators turn out in iran. they aamass outside the swiss embassy, which represents u.s. interests in iran. let's get the latest now from that region. mohammed jamjoon join us. >> about 2,000 to 3,000 protesters that were
's talk about this reported debt relief to egypt. will it happen? guest: i think it will likely happen. when? within the next week. since february 2011, the problem has been at the united states wants to provide debt relief. not as a right off. half of it would be budget relief. the other half would be money for things like infrastructure, job creation. the united states says we are providing this release. -- relief host: the transition to democracy has not been an easy one. how is it going? guest: no transitions to democracy are ever easy. he ruled for 30 years. the transition has been a difficult one. it has been bumpy. at this point there is the first civilian elected president. he comes from the muslim brotherhood. there is no parliament. it was dissolved. there is no constitution yet. assembly is writing the constitution. there are a lot of unknowns. the new president has done things that raise questions about his commitment to a more democratic system there. there have been pressures on journalists. questions about women's rights. there remain a lot of questions. the continued to
to a certain degree in egypt. is that what you're seeing, ben? >> certainly among the leaders of the muslim brotherhood and in the administration of the egyptian president, there is an attempt to calm down the situation rhetorically. and certainly we've seen in messages conveyed by leaders of the muslim brotherhood and the egyptian president, they're trying to send a message of reassurance to washington. but at the same time they're kind of walking a tight rope between washington and the street here in egypt, where there is anger, where we have seen these protests really going on around the clock. and therefore there's a difference between what we're hearing in english from the egyptian government and from the muslim brotherhood and what we're reading on the website of the muslim brotherhood in arabic and what we're hearing from the rank and file. for instance, on friday we attended a demonstration outside a mosque where they were chanting the obama, there are a million osamas. this is from the rank and file of the muslim brotherhood where they say the united states is the patron of interna
the we from egypt to as far west as morocco and as far east as indiana. >> egypt the main hotspot right now. where the violence first erupted three days ago. this morning there were more flashes, protesters setting fires, and the egyptian military deploying tanks to calm things down. but we just learned that the muslim brotherhood has canceled nationwide protests, announcing instead that a protest will be held only in tahrir square against that film about the prophet muhammad. >> to yemen, at least five protesters were killed. we showed you those pictures yesterday morning of the protest outside the u.s. embassy. they stormed that embassy and the capital city of sanaa. they were climbing the walls, setting tires on fire. water cannons pushing them back. >> in iran, hundreds of protesters have been gathering outside the swiss embassy in tehran, shouting death to the united states. the swiss embassy handles u.s. interests in iran, and is being heavily guarded right now by police. >> as for the president, president obama vowing all necessary steps. security being beefed up to protect u.s.
? we have a number of reports. no american should visit egypt for the rest of the year. nobody goes. that will send that government a big-time message. >> am i your humble correspondent being irresponsible by suggesting that americans avoid egypt? geraldo has some thoughts. >> my temperature runs a couple degrees higher around 100. i don't mind. >> every equivocating, triangulating son of a pitch in office today spends half his time woring after special interest money. >> has kathleen turner jumped the shark? we have a brand new segment entitled what the heck just happened? ms. turner is featured tonight. >> now leave me alone. >> caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. fomc in the muslim world part 2. that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. as we told you last night. mr. obama should change his approach when dealing with the muslim world. it's obvious the soft power strategy not working. jihadists don't care what mr. obama says and any sign of sensitivity will b
night. again, today in egypt, there are hundreds of protesters and they've clashed with security forces outside the u.s. embassy in cairo while president obama went out of his way yesterday to re-affirmfies with the fledgling libyan government. did he not say a word about egypt all day until he was asked by telemundo whether the second largest recipient of american foreign aid after israel at $2 billion a year is still an ally of the united states of america. >> i don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't ker them consider them an. they are a new government that's trying to find its way. they were democratically elected. i think that we are going to have to see how they respond to this incident, how they respond to, for example, maintaining the peace treaty in -- with israel. >> after that interview, the president then had two calls last night, one with the president of libya and another with egypt's president where, according to the white house, president obama underscored the importance of egypt following through on its commitment to cooperate with the united state
traditionally not only in egypt but in the arab world the preeminent foreign policy issue of the region. now that the muslim brotherhood and its president is in power, i think it would have been surprising if they did not showcase this issue, because obviously it has formed a big part of their foreign policy thinking for years. >> egypt received $1.6 billion in aid a year from the u.s. if egypt has a where your relation with the u.s., will that a continue? >> it is an interesting moment when egypt is partially reconstructing it shrek -- its relation with the united states. the military relationship continues, and that has gone on for many years. yet now there is an elected civilian president that is trying to assert the degree of independence at a moment when both sides are now trying to understand the priorities of each other, and the united states is adjusting to an egyptian leader that has to respond to some degree to the wants and desires of his own people. it is a much more high maintenance type of relationship because nothing can be taken for granted in the same way that it was when eg
in libya. in egypt, the conditions are much different. more protests against the offending anti-muslim film have been called for tomorrow. there have been no statements by the transitional government in egypt, not about the protests or about the reaction to them. it's also worth noting that the president did not mention the protests in cairo or the breach of the u.s. embassy in his statement today, indicating the continued volatility of the situation on the ground in egypt. all this is what my "washington post" colleague david ignatius calls, quote, the fog of revolution. these are two countries transitioning from decades of existence under despottic conditions to governments with at least some foundations in representative democracy. the balance there is delicate and very difficult to cut through the motivations of the various factions and shadowy militant groups that are currently vying for power. and the outcome, who wins and who loses these struggles, could decide the very shape of american foreign policy in the decades to come. middle east with an egypt that is friendly to american int
, libya and in cairo, egypt. >> mr. president, for the first time since 1979, a sitting ambassador, christopher stevens, plus three other americans were killed in the line of duty. we send more than a billion dollars a year to egypt, tens of millions to libya after its liberation. is it time to reconsider foreign aid to countries where many of the people don't want us around? >> well, look, the united states doesn't have an option of withdrawing from the world, and we're the one indispensable nation. countries all around the world look to us for leadership, even countries where sometimes you experience protests. so it's important for us to stay engaged, but, obviously, what happened last night was heartbreaking. and libya in particular is a government that is very friendly towards us. the vast majority of libyans welcomed the united states' involvement. they understand that it's because of us that they got rid of a dictator who would crush their spirits for 40 years. many libyans came to the defense of our team in benghazi when they were attacked. but, you know, what we have to do
mohammed. we will go to yemen and egypt where protests have entered a third day. then to one of the world's leading islamic scholars, tariq ramadan on "islam and the arab awakening." >> if you look at the situation in tunisia and egypt, corruption, poverty, unemployment -- many people who were visiting egypt are dealing with the media saying, there is something not going right. the situation is very bad. we knew something could happen. >> as new census figures show 46,000 americans -- millions of americans are in poverty, we will speak with tavis smiley and cornel west. >> inequality, the top 1% got 93% of income in 2010. income. wealth. that is morally obscene. it is an ethical abomination. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. protests are spreading in the middle east over u.s. made film considered blasphemous to islam. earlier today hundreds of yemeni demonstrators stormed the u.s. embassy in sanaa, smashing windows and burning cars before breaking through the compound's main gate. protests have also oc
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,350 (some duplicates have been removed)